Wednesday, January 15, 2014

...but I still refuse to say "kit".



You have been warned!

Just kidding.

Actually, I have some of the Vickers/Tango Down baseplates and they're pretty cool. The extended mag release, though, is just absolutely Goldilocks.

The standard one on Glocks is stubby enough that it often doesn't release the mags cleanly for me, and the factory extended unit is too long and pointy and easy to push accidentally. I wholeheartedly endorse the Vickers unit; I'm happy I put one on my G-lock.

19 comments:

taylor said...

I thought the "just" was implied when using Goldilocks. Then again, I have to urban dictionary something weird i read online every day...so Im not exactly an authority.

Anonymous said...

Please don't shoot me in the face!

I do like the Vickers slings.

Gerry

Old NFO said...

I'll have to look into that, but mine's a Gen 1... sigh

rremington said...

As usual you are correct in your assessment on both items.

Joseph said...

I wholeheartedly endorse the Vickers unit; I'm happy I put one on my G-lock.

Uh TMI. Although I'm sure Larry would be happy to know you endorse his "unit", but where is your "G-lock" located? I can never find those. #singleforareason

Tam said...

Old NFO,

"I'll have to look into that, but mine's a Gen 1... sigh "

They make 'em for the Gen1-3 Glocks, too. (Mine's a Gen3 19.)

Robin said...

You won't say "kit" but will you say "spanner" ?

T Putnam said...

I have your number. You've been put on notice.

Robin said...

T Putnam, did I miss something?

Tam said...

Robin,

Probably. ;)

Robin said...

Tam, ah -- now I recall. That was perfect. And I fell for it too ... ;-)

Well played Mr. Putnam. Well played.

Anonymous said...

I remember that kerfuffle but I still don't see what that has to do with saying kit.

Terry

Tam said...

I don't say "kit" because it'd British slang and I'm not British. An American saying "kit" sounds as dorky as an American saying "footie" or "spanner".

Grumpy Sergeant said...

I honestly don't get what the big hoopla is all about the mag catch. After gently enquring at my local lgs about the cost and comparing the price of the stock extended release and what they wantec for the Vickers catch (please note I didn't say "unit") I bought a Glock one and spent about 5 min shaping it to my needs.0

mariner said...

Glock extended mag release + Dremel = custom extended mag release

Sorry if someone promised there'd be no math. ;)

Tam said...

For the time it takes to get the tools out and dick around with whittling on a spare factory catch (because I want to save the original un-molestered pat) I think I'll spring the extra Happy Meal and get the aftermarket part.

If you just can't spring the difference, yeah, you can buy a Glock extended catch and whittle it down.

Lewis said...

Tam said: I don't say "kit" because it'd British slang and I'm not British. An American saying "kit" sounds as dorky as an American saying "footie" or "spanner".

Lewis said: I think I'm in love. Naw, really, I've been saying the same thing for a year or two now, only using "lorry" and "boot" as my examples. Kit is a fine word, but it ain't ours. (I wonder if the Brit equivalent of gear queer is kit queen?)

Grumpy Sergeant said...

"For the time it takes to get the tools out and dick around with whittling on a spare factory catch (because I want to save the original un-molestered pat) I think I'll spring the extra Happy Meal and get the aftermarket part.

If you just can't spring the difference, yeah, you can buy a Glock extended catch and whittle it down"

No argument, just a point. I personally enjoy whittling on my glocks. I get a great deal of satisfaction from personalizing something to my taste, and considering I've had a knife and a Dremel for as long as I remember its worth it. Believe me, I'll be the first one to throw cash at something IOT save time.

On the other hand, when that mag release first came out, I couldn't get my head around all the fanboi squee because the LAV had produced the world's greatest mag catch. I realize you don't fall into that category, it's just a note.

Ancient Woodsman said...

Plenty of Americans say "spanner" on a regular basis...just not for the British reason.

A 'spanner' is the hand tool that firefighters use to loosen hose couplings. They are tightened by hand before use, but after use (having had pressurized water flown though) they often need a tool overcome the new tightness in order to take apart the hose couplings. That tool is what firefighters call a 'spanner'.

They come in different sizes. A small 'forestry' spanner for 1" & 1 1/2" hose, one that fits the 1 1/2" couplings on 1 1/2" and 1 3/4" hose as well as the 2 1/2" couplings on 2 1/2" and 3" hose, and a larger one for 4" and 5" (Storz) fittings. As I write this, there is an American somewhere, in training, a classroom, a blog comments section, or on a fire scene that is using the word 'spanner' and not in the British sense at all.