Saturday, May 31, 2014

Fun Show Time!

Let's sing the Fun Show Song!
Flintlocks and Flop-tops
And Number Three Russians
Black-powder Mausers
From jackbooted Prussians,
Shiny Smith PC's from limited runs
These are a few of my favorite guns.

Socketed bay'nets
On Zulu War rifles,
Engraved, iv'ried Lugers
That make quite an eyefull
Mosin tomato stakes sold by the ton
These are a few of my favorite guns.

Rusty top-breaks!
Smallbore Schuetzens!
And all of Browning's spawn
I just keep on browsing my favorite guns
Until all my money's gone. 
Mostly just looking for ammo this time around, I'm afraid, although if I see a screaming deal on a "West Dakota Department of Fisheries"-marked 3rd Gen Smith autoloader, I will be sorely tempted.

Speaking of which, I've noticed a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth on the intertubes of late over the news that S&W isn't going to be stocking 3rd Gen auto parts anymore.

Oh, noes! *mock horror*

Look, they haven't cataloged the guns for, what? Half a decade, now? More? And I haven't called to check, but odds are good that they were selling out of New Old Stock already by then and had actually ceased production before that. Welcome to the way of all machines. Tried to buy old Hand Ejector or Top Break parts from Smith lately?

There's going to be a downturn in spares-'n'-repairs availability until parts houses fill the vacuum by buying old cop guns in lots. Which will reduce the number of guns in circulation. Which will drive up the price of older guns. And so it goes.
.

15 comments:

aepilot_jim said...

It's a vicious circle. Speaking of, have you tried to source sear springs for vicious circles lately?

Scott J said...

Sounds like I might need to divert some hobby money over the next few years into a small CNC mill and learn how to use it.

There are hobbyist setups out there in the $5K range.

Uno Mas (SASS #80082) said...

I hope I'm not the only one that giggles like a schoolgirl every time I see the Gun Show Song.

John A said...

economics. I doubt the parts were still being made, and if they were those production machines and employees might be moved to newer product lines. Then too, taxes: a relative is an electrical contractor, has to stock some parts for decades, and has to pay about 10% tax on them every year as inventory.

mikee said...

If I were the suspicious type, I'd be thinking that you have already cornered the market on several states' worth of Fisheries Department surplus, and that you are trying to drive the price up before releasing a select few back onto the market.

I'll take a Ladysmith Model 3913 9mm from any state, any Dept., thank you, when you are ready to sell. If it comes from a women's prison I'll pay extra.

Bubblehead Les. said...

That's sad. But one has to wonder if BMW will still be providing parts for Zed Dreis?

Tam said...

I'm not sure, but I believe the auto industry's spare parts situation is governed by legislation. (Although, as I think I mentioned before, one of the clinchers in picking the Z3 over the Boxster for me was the long-term spares situation, what with the BMW roadster being based on the common-as-dirt E36 under the skin.

Windy Wilson said...

I was peeved to no end to find that my VW Jetta was no longer supported by the factory after it turned 20. Couldn't they at least have waited until it was old enough to get off my health insurance?
And I don't know what the various manufacturers did, but there aren't any third party parts stores around here anymore. It's a terrible choice; go to the dealer, where I pay as if I had actually adopted a genuine Italian Ferrari mechanic, or to to Al's Shade Tree Garage, and deal with the barefoot mechanic who can't tell a 2" stainless steel exhaust from the 1 1/2" carbon steel stock.

Kevin R.C. O'Brien said...

I was surprised to find, in Germany in 1987, that an exhaust O-ring for a 1965 Mustang with a C5ZZ part number, was readily available from the German Ford dealer (German and American Fords have very few points of commonality, but the global part system could order any part number). Of course, parts for the Mustang are well supplied by an aftermarket now. That's generally true for enthusiast and sports cars -- somebody will make the parts if there are enough cars and they have enough value, like 57 chevies, any Mustang or T-Bird or Corvette, and E-type Jags.

As part of their bankruptcy, Government Motors ceased supporting my other old car, a 1996 Impala SS. But as it only has 90k miles and is, under the skin, a common and garden 90s cop car, It will probably outlive me.

I'm at a loss to replace it, actually. Haven't found an reasonably-priced, reliable, front-engine/rear-drive car that will take five stout Americans and five 100-lb rucks of lightweight gear cross country comfortably.

My own long-ago experience with a BMW was not good. Great car in dry conditions, but treacherous in the wet, and very expensive to maintain (633).

Kevin R.C. O'Brien said...

I was surprised to find, in Germany in 1987, that an exhaust O-ring for a 1965 Mustang with a C5ZZ part number, was readily available from the German Ford dealer (German and American Fords have very few points of commonality, but the global part system could order any part number). Of course, parts for the Mustang are well supplied by an aftermarket now. That's generally true for enthusiast and sports cars -- somebody will make the parts if there are enough cars and they have enough value, like 57 chevies, any Mustang or T-Bird or Corvette, and E-type Jags.

As part of their bankruptcy, Government Motors ceased supporting my other old car, a 1996 Impala SS. But as it only has 90k miles and is, under the skin, a common and garden 90s cop car, It will probably outlive me.

I'm at a loss to replace it, actually. Haven't found an reasonably-priced, reliable, front-engine/rear-drive car that will take five stout Americans and five 100-lb rucks of lightweight gear cross country comfortably.

My own long-ago experience with a BMW was not good. Great car in dry conditions, but treacherous in the wet, and very expensive to maintain (633).

Scott J said...

"I'm not sure, but I believe the auto industry's spare parts situation is governed by legislation"

I recall from my time as a counterman that the OEMs were federally mandated to make spare parts for 15 years after the manufacture date of any given model.

Of course being so long ago my recollection could be fuzzy but I am certain there was a federally mandated window for the production of spares.

RevolverRob said...

This is why I own a small-block V8 powered vintage Ford (see parts found in Germany above) and only carry guns currently manufactured. Sure I love vintage guns, but finding parts for a Colt Detective Special is a special kind of challenge. Meanwhile finding parts for a Smith J-Frame, like finding parts for any Falcon-based vintage Ford is a 3-minute phone-call or 3-minute browser-click away.

-Rob

Stretch said...

I do know that an Ejector Rod Head (Old Style) for a Colt Official Police is DAMN hard to find.
*subtle plea for help*

RevolverRob said...

Stretch,

Did you call Grant Cunningham? http://www.grantcunningham.com/ - Grant is essentially the only Colt revolversmith still working as near as I can tell. I don't know if he will have the part, but he might be able to give you potential sources to exploit.

-Rob

Sigivald said...

Stretch: I assume you've tried calling Numrich?