Thursday, January 08, 2009

Two great tastes that taste great together...

Shootin' Buddy's brother recently dragged Old Bossy behind the woodshed and, thanks to my connections, I wound up with a bunch of ground beef destined to wind up in chili or a meatloaf and a big ol' porterhouse destined to wind up in my tummy.

I cooked it up yesterday using my newfound mad, 1337 stovetop steak skills that have been honed on bison fillets (and the tactics that make for a tender bison fillet will make for a fall-apart-under-the-fork cow porterhouse.)

As an aside. Fresh Market sells bitty little bottles of various mediocre wines near the checkout counter. This is handy: A splash of merlot in with the steak and the rest in a glass, et voila! She is lunch!

5 comments:

atlharp said...

Try some cheap cognac with the standard marinade. It give beef a little zing!

I would do the ground chuck with chili though. Chili= YUM!!

Ken said...

Only cook with a wine worth drinking. Always.

Anonymous said...

Wait a tick, tamslick, the cows he slaughtered were raised from calves on grass without hormones or antibiotics. Not exactly "Old Bossy". :-)

Two cows and two deer this year. His freezers are full!

angus lincoln said...

Watched a carnivore's dream on the History channel today; The History of Butchering will put hair on your chest and give you absolutely no misconceptions regarding the origins of your meat stuff. One thing you will learn is that no other country does more to ensure clean packing facilities.I didn't know about mobile slaughterhouses that can back up to the stall and take care of business all with a .gov inspector no less!
Try a little pastrami rub on your next grilling steak with some sweet sauteed onions!

HTRN said...

Tam, if you want a neat trick for pan searing a steak - try heating the steak in a low temp oven first(275@20min). The idea is to bring up the internal temperature first, to 90-105F, so that when you pan sear it, you don't overcook the outside in order to get the inside up to 150-160F.