Wednesday, November 08, 2006

Blasphemously happy.

I probably shouldn't admit this, because it will cost me what little conservative street cred I have, but I was smiling when I saw that Santorum (Wahaabist- PA) got stomped. He's a microcosm of all that's wrong with the GOP. Bigger government? Not a problem, as long as that bigger government is used to do important big government things, like give state-mandated marriage counseling to divorcing couples. Tax reform? Economic policy? None of that's as important as getting Intelligent Design on the curriculum...

For all I know, the new guy will shed his "Moderate Democrat" image thirty seconds after getting sworn in, and I know I'll probably find plenty of reasons to loathe him, too, but at least he hasn't told me to shut up and get back in the kitchen.

21 comments:

MDL said...

Although I'm not so sure Casey wouldn't have won if he wasn't Robert Casey's son. I actually think that some of the local tv stations thought he was his father, who "did so much for Pennsylvania". I'm just glad that I go to an out of state college and worked out of state most of the summer so I only got 2 weeks of it. And I agree with you, I do not mourn Santourum's loss.

3yellowdogs said...

On balance, I'd rather have Santorum than lose him, but understand your glee. For me, seeing Lincoln Chafee go down in flames was almost worth losing both the house and the senate. He has always been the poster boy for RINOism. The country (and certainly the party) is better off without him.

Justin said...

Tam, that's about the most succinct description of why I have come to dislike the Republicans that has been posted on the interetubes.

phlegmfatale said...

Why does reading that stuff that Santorum said make me think he has a lot in common with the same guys who would like to slap a burqa on me? Wow. I've heard the flap over this peripherally, but hadn't paid attention and didn't know what was going on with that. Thanks for the clarification.

And talk about abandoning one's base - as a person, I find George Bush to be an affable Texas sort of guy, the kind I meet here frequently, but politically, he's been WAY too liberal for my tastes, and I don't get how it is that Democrats have been screaming about him considering he's been so accommodating of their prime directive to grow the government and entitlements.
Oh, and I agree with Justin - cogently stated.

treefroggy said...

You have a kitchen ?

Marc said...

Bwahahaha! Welcome to the dark side. Your concreds may have tanked but you're libertarin creds are rising.

Anonymous said...

Thank gawd, the neo-con christian-facists are being tossed out of the GOP.

Abe Lincoln wants his gawd damn part back. He's comin' out of the tomb and kickin some arse!

George said...

I posted this to another blog but I thought I would comment here, too. I'm not sure about the etiquette of doing so but I usually check into Tam's blog first thing.

As some of you know, I am fairly ardent in my Canadianism but I also know the name of the elephant in our North American room. So, here goes.

I am reviewing the results of the mid-terms from your neighbour to the North. I acknowledge that Canadians don't often understand and appreciate America. (I include the tens of thousands of draft dodgers who still remain here.)

Firstly, the swing of seats in the House was not that unexpected for a mid-term. We have a slightly similar phenomenon in our own in-session by-elections. The sitting party will often be the target of the disaffected. So, supporters of the GOP should not have been surprised.

Secondly, Iraq was not the only issue. In many of the lost GOP districts, according to RNC analysis, the major issue was ethics. Americans had an opportunity to do something about what they perceived was a gap between their own views and what their representatives did. Since the Carter years, there has been a significant disaffection with the political process. Some of that rested with the lack of trust and confidence in the electorate. Honour, ethical conduct and respect will win out.

Thirdly, Americans were faced with an unusual but not surprising conflict between their deep down and unwavering faith and support for members of the military and their rejection of the course of the war in Iraq (and perhaps Afghanistan, too). A lot of ink has been spent on the Rumsfeld matter. That's over now but I do believe that Americans will continue their support for the members of the armed forces but will also continue their desire for something better in Iraq. The reality is that, despite whatever you think may happen to American prestige, etc., a country cannot continue sacrificing lives forever. An American pull out from Iraq is not in the cards, in my opinion but something better is necessary. Again, unfortunately, the better course of action will also cost lives. I believe that America has to state, quite clearly, what the precise definition of success in Iraq constitutes. Americans have said that platitudes are no longer acceptable. Americans have said that they want to know what their leadership means and intends, as the count of wounded and dead mount. (We feel that same way for our troops in Afghanistan and I hope we do not falter.)

Fourthly, your system of checks and balances has been seriously awry. Now, the intentions of your founding fathers can be revisited. Nothing will be achieved unilaterally. Nothing is beyond true and honest non-partisanship. No one has a lock on the 'right' thing.

I truly admire America, unlike the majority of Canadians. I envy the way your political structure allows the electorate to send a real, significant and powerful wake-up call to the executive branch. We cannot do that in Canada. I do not know what the Democrats will do but I do know they no longer have the luxury of being in opposition without offering alternatives. I do not know what the GOP will do although Mr Bush's remarks in his press conference were promising.

War often brings a coalition, in reality or in sense, to the governing bodies of a nation. Perhaps a war should make the parties dispense with the mundane and petty matters of politics and concentrate on what truly counts. The sacrifice of healthy, strong and courageous men and women demands more.

Regards,
George

Joe said...

I'm actually calm here in the People's Republic of Taxachusetts: the black Mike Dukakis won, along with the woman Tom Reily AG clone. It will be just peachy limited to 1 gun a month ( which I'll have to budget for :) ) and NH blamed for everything that goes wrong in Boston. I guess that the reason I'm calm is that I can left this hole and not have anything to hold me back!

Well, the Repubs got a nice kick in the 'nads for their total lack of doing anything that even looked like it was conservative in nature. They have 2 years to pull their collective heads out of their asses to change the party back to where it should be - but do they have the people to do that? Only time will tell...

Lizard said...

I've paid little attention to specific local races, but they play campaign ads on the TVs in my gym, so I've been inundated with them. I decided I liked Baron Hill, on the grounds that everything his OPPONENTS said about him struck me as a good reason to vote FOR him. Anyone who opposes video game censorship, and supports gay marriage and stem cell research is a good guy in my book.

Jeff the Baptist said...

Santorum was my senator for a while before I moved. Honestly, I'm surprised he lasted as long as he did. He was a very conservative Senator in a not-very conservative state. He was also tactless and had a tendency to put both feet in his mouth at once.

That being the case, most of what he said makes a lot more sense if you read his entire statement instead of the cherry-picked quotes on his opponent's websites.

Tam said...

From where I sit, it doesn't get any better when reading whole chapters of his book.

Anonymous said...

Not wishing to be a drag at the celebrations here, so can I check back with y'all in about a year or so? And for the record, I think that bush will now come out of the closet and reveal himself as the democrap that he has always secretly been.

bjbarron said...

"...reveal himself as the democrap that he has always secretly been."

That's never been much of a secret. I've always wondered if the progressives would spontaneously combust if a real conservative had the top spot.

rickn8or said...

"I've always wondered if the progressives would spontaneously combust if a real conservative had the top spot."

Now THERE'S a lovely, happy thought to get me through the day!

Lizard said...

Totally off-topic for this entry, but have you seen this?

http://www.seasonshot.com/Home.cfm

3yellowdogs said...

OMG, lizard. That's the craziest thing I've ever seen.

That HAS to be a joke. I can't imagine the pellets would have much travel or stopping power.

What happens if you only shoot the bird on one side? Will everyone fight over that side of the duck?

Lizard said...

I'm assuming it's a joke. I didn't have time to explore the site in depth, but there's probably clues there (like no working order page). But it's a funny joke, and it's one of those "just so crazy it might almost be true" things.

bjbarron said...

Apparently the Season Shot is real. They've got a booth listed at gamefair.com under the name Season Shot-Gerltom Medical Inc.

Anonymous said...

I guess it is too good to have an honest politician. You may not like his stand , but you knew where it was .

Tam said...

" I guess it is too good to have an honest politician. You may not like his stand , but you knew where it was."

I knew where Idi Amin's stance was, too. What the hell does that have to do with the price of tea in China?