Saturday, May 27, 2006

Boomsticks: Gratuitous Gun Pr0n No. 30


S&W Model 64-4, circa 1994, and Greco Whisper, circa 2002.

The above is known teasingly as my "cookie recipe gun." The name came about from me saying "Of course there's a gun in arm's reach when I'm in bed. I assume if I wake up to find a strange person in my bedroom, he ain't there to swap cookie recipes."

Thus, the reasons for the 2" K-frame:

1) It'll likely be used at contact distances, and can't be pushed out of battery like an auto.
2) It'll likely be used at contact distances, and only has a 2" barrel for the assailant to grab, while I have a full K-frame grip in my hand.
3) It'll likely be used at contact distances, and is made of steel so it can be used to beat someone to a paste if the six shots don't do the trick.


So, yeah, a little thought went into picking out a firearm for that particular task. And, for what it's worth, the only cookie recipes I know involve slicing the dough into circles of regular thickness...

15 comments:

Ben said...

Imagine those on a black velvet background! Work on that, Tam. Get a piece about seven or eight feet long. That way, ahem, it could be used for other....alluring..... subjects.


Rifles!

Porta's Cat said...

I had to answer this posting....

my tam style post...

T.Stahl said...

Ben, I think Tam onced mentioned that a Barrett wouldn't fit in her Beemer!

gmcraff said...

Am I alone in thinking, "with such enumerated reasons, a sturdy bayonet mount on that J-frame would not be amiss"?

Add a 6-protruding-inch, double edge stilleto blade right under that 2-inch barrel, and nobody is going to be grabbing for it. The J-frame will also made for a good punch-dagger style grip.

Diamondback said...

Beautiful gun, Love the Light wood stain of the grips with the Stainless frame.

Tam said...

What I like the most about this photo is all the shades of brown, and the different textures of gray: the brushed steel on the gun, bead-blasted knife, and the pebbly texture of the concrete.

Les Jones said...

Lurvely. If you ever decide to get rid of that gun, don't you dare sell it without giving me a shot at it. I still kick myself for passing up a 2" 64 with Detroit PD markgins.

BTW, what dash number is it?

Tam said...

It's a 64-4. :)

mdl said...

"Ben, I think Tam onced mentioned that a Barrett wouldn't fit in her Beemer!"

That's what the passenger seat is for, duh. I bet it would go over well with the locals to see a little ragtop with 2 feet of barrel and the muzzle brake sticking out over the windshield. Also I don't know, but it seems possible that the brake may become a whistle if it is in the slip stream just right.

Marc said...

circa? I can't remember dates of acquisition so well either anymore. I'm guessing your trying to catch up to my age. If it's up to me, I won't give you a chance to actually catch up for many a year. :)

Les Jones said...

"It's a 64-4."

I fact you cleverly and fiendishly hid in the caption. I see you've read "The Purloined Letter." :-)

Countertop said...

What kind of grips are on that?

gorgeous

Homer said...

Much many nice. I've got its ugly cousin in a 66 (Pachmyer grips), for mostly the same reasons. (I was looking for a two-inch 65, but the 66 turned up at a very good price. I've never quite understood why anyone would want adjustable sights on a two-inch revolver; it's either supreme optimism or just putting lipstick on a pig).

Given the ranges involved, any thoughts on bobbing the hammer?

phlegmfatale said...

ooh, another pretty one - more lovely woodsmithing there. And I pity the fool...

Tam said...

"What kind of grips are on that?"

Those are factory S&W smooth combat stocks (aka "banana grips") in, I believe, Goncalo Alves.