Sunday, August 05, 2012

RAIN!

Close to an inch in a gullywasher yesterday afternoon, and then at around 0500 today the various night lights around Roseholme Cottage went all stroboscopic as another inch of rain came through, borne on 60mph straight-line winds.

Weather.com is claiming 1.81" inches of precip in the last 24 hours, which probably handily exceeds June and July's rainfall totals, combined. A glance out the windows this morning shows that the little hail we got didn't seem to hurt the jalapenos or the 'maters.

This has been one of those droughts that has me worrying about trees. As I remarked to Bobbi the other day, we really won't know how bad it was until we get a good load of ice on those branches come February. Then we'll see what made it through the drought.

I'm going to hop on my bicycle and pedal through the puddles...

7 comments:

Robert Fowler said...

We had a warning in yesterdays paper about ground shrinkage and foundations cracking. I guess I need to water the house too.

kx59 said...

Tens of thousands of trees died in last summer's drought down here. I suspect you can expect the same.

@Robert: Probably preaching to the choir, but soaker hoses laid along the perimeter of the house work very well

Panamared said...

Puddle splashin might be the best part of a good rain, when the rains are regular. I bet it's even more fun when the rain comes either during or ending a drought.

Roy in Nipomo said...

Robert, if I lived in your area I would have needed the warning. Living in an area of Calif that normally goes six months without rain (and nine months in a drought), such a problem would have been inconceivable. We just naturally expect the ground to dry out and build accordingly.

Kristopher said...

Yup. Those low areas Californians build houses in are called "lakes" in the rest of the US.

Justthisguy said...

"pedal through the puddles." That's quite poetic, Ma'am. It reminds me of "Tiptoe through the tulips."

I recently lubed the chain on my bike, and am sorry to say that some of the oil got onto the rim. I did my best wiping job with detergent, but that did not suffice.

Fortunately, Flarduh thunderstorms provided me with plenty of deep puddles in which to rinse my rims. Brakes work much better now.

GreatBlueWhale said...

Sadly, the drought damage for trees may not be evident for a couple of years, and then they "mysteriously" start dying. We lost an enormous shagbark hickory, and three medium pinoaks after the really bad drought here in central Kentucky.