Saturday, August 09, 2014

1930 Farmall Regular

This clean tractor had a lot of pull.

Label

Exhausted

Steering gear
All the above pics can be embiggenated to varying degrees by clickery.
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15 comments:

tailwind said...

I've never seen mechanical power steering before.

Alien said...

I lamented not making it to the NRA convention in Indy this year, placating myself with the admonishment that 2015 will be in Nashville which is 200 miles closer. Much easier on the dollar and time budgets, that is.

After your pics, I'm considering skipping Nashville and coming to the fair in Indy. Anyplace with that many Real People (TM) and tractors has greater value.

Sigman said...

The Knoxville TN fair used to have a large tractor display, not that extensive though.

Sklutch said...

Older tractors do seem to have a charm missing in today's workhorses. I'm priv'd to be tasked with mowing a friend's pastures since his job is expanding to all hours of the day and I get to use his '65 Ford. It's a pleasure that triggers memories of my childhood on the farm, of sitting on the fender of the tractor while dad did the actual work. Of course, OSHA would've had conniptions, but they were still asleep while we headed out to the fields. :)

Old NFO said...

Nice ones! :-)

David said...

Check out the axle position in relation to the wheel hubs,
It used remote gears at the wheels to allow for a higher
axle that would clear row crops

IIRC, the Regular was the first successful Row Crop tractor
in the US

bluesun said...

My grandpa had a couple of those, and so I had a cast iron scale model of one, too, that's still around here somewhere.

Billll said...

Ah, the joys of open top motoring.

Anonymous said...

Awesome tractor pics the last few days. Sorry for an off-topic comment, but I thought you'd get a chuckle from this true story, from They Live!!! : The 1000 Year Reign of the Cleti.

I took the kiddos to the local air show today, which show featured a very well-done WWII "European Theatre" (no specific battle) reenactment, including 5 operable Stuart tanks. Accompanying those tanks were 50 or so GI infantry reenactors, armed, of course, with the venerable Garand. As they merrily popped away at Jerry downrange, clips pinged to and fro. I was about to open my mouth to point out to the boys a BAR being used for doctrinal "walking fire", when I heard the following, sagely delivered from an elder Cleti to a up-and-comer: "…and ya' hear that 'ping?' Got plenty of our boys kilt. Garand ejects the clip on the last round, and every damn time it makes that 'ping.' Germans could hear it every time, and believe me they'd take advantage. Towards the end of the war, our boys got wise and would toss and empty clip in the air with a full one in the gun, the Germans would see it and charge, and we'd CUT THEM DOWN!"

They live!!!


Comrade Misfit said...

I tried to guesstimate how many turns of the steering wheel it took to move the horizontal gear through 45deg and all I can say is "my head hurts".

Ed Jones said...

Second picture, that is a manual ooga horn between the fuel tank and the steering wheel. My grandpa had one on a old tractor. I due not remember what brand of tractor but I can see that horn like it was yesterday.

Ed Jones said...

Do, do/ ???

og said...

I love the exhaust. "Well, we made this carburetor out of some brass we found out behind the shed, and some faucet parts, and a piece off a brass bedstead. it pretty well leaks like a sieve about half the time, so we'd better put a plate under it to catch the leaking gas to make sure it doesn't pour right on top of the red hot exhaust. Oh, I don't know, shape it like a upside down teardrop for all I care, just keep it from setting itself on fire"

Darrell said...

That must be like steering a boat.

Hey, where's our free ice cream?!

Sigman said...

My grandpa had a 50s model H model Farmall. Some of my best childhood memories are of me riding on that tractor with him. There's something about old tractors....