Thursday, June 26, 2008

Hints From Heloise: Home gunsmithing department.

Hint From Heloise: Bobbing the hammer on your Smith & Wesson revolver? After you've ground the spur off, a little cold blue smudged unevenly around the site of the spurectomy with a q-tip will help the ground area blend with the case-colored finish of the hammer.

7 comments:

HokiePundit said...

Be sure to only bob the hammers on SA revolvers. With a DA revolver there's still a chance that you could fire the gun by pulling the trigger, and we certainly don't want that.

curtislowe said...

"Be sure to only bob the hammers on SA revolvers. With a DA revolver there's still a chance that you could fire the gun by pulling the trigger, and we certainly don't want that."

Hunh? (1) If you bob the hammer on a SA revolver, how do you pull the hammer back in order to cock the gun, and (2) I thought the whole purpose of bobbing a hammer on a revolver is so that you can carry a DA revolver concealed without snagging clothes on the draw.

Tam said...

I think he was being silly.

HokiePundit said...

Yep, Tamara's right. And for safety's sake, it's probably best to bob the trigger, too. Can't be too safe these days!

Alex said...

NOOOOOOOOOO!

Case colored triggers and hammers or some of my favorite things on S&Ws.

HTRN said...

On a more serious note, Generally speaking, you also remove the half cock notch along with the spur, thus making the revolver DAO.

Tam said...

You know, I don't get too squeamish when Johnny Dremel goes after his hammer spur, provided he's dab hand with the cutoff wheel.

I get a little queasy when he pops the sideplate off, though.

As far as the "blotchy cold blue" gimmick, it was used on this Model 57 to good effect. You have to look at the hammer closely to tell that it's not a factory bob.