Friday, September 28, 2012

Curator Needed, Part III...

This brave Hoosier corporal is going to be one sad panda when he caps off the single shot in his floptop Springfield, since his cartridge belt is full of .30-40 Krag ammo instead of the .45-70 required by his rifle.

12 comments:

Yrro said...

Have you considered offering to at least fix their signs for them? Seems like it would be some good charity work for a good cause. It's possible they're clueless with good intentions and would take the help.

mustanger said...

Likely as not, though, they may count on the public not noticing.

Vaarok said...

I heard once the enemy ran out of their kind of ammo they could just use our bullets, but we couldn't use theirs!

Drang said...

Would a cannon-cocker have been armed with a rifle, or a carbine?

Anonymous said...

Has the New York Times taken over your local Museum?

Anonymous said...

You can't store an assault weapon and the proper ammunition where just any bitter clinger could lay hands to it.

TinCan Assassin said...

You'll take what the Army gives you dammit, and like it!

I swear, make them an NCO and they get all uppity.

Angus McThag said...

Clearly he's part of the .30-40 approval tests.

http://trapdoorcollector.com/cal30.html

Vaarok said...

If he was part of the trapdoor smokeless experiments, he has too many hands and fingers.

NotClauswitz said...

That belt, in good shape, is worth a few Franklins! If it was full of cartridges it would be worth even more.

Anonymous said...

This silliness is fairly endemic -
My estimation of the London Imperial War Museum took a hit with the oopsies I noted on a visit in the '70s: IIRC, they had a Pattern 14 Enfield IDed as an '03Springfield, an 1895 Winchester in musket trim called a doughboys weapon, and the Vietnam exhibit was
subtly comedic - an MAT49 called a
'US grease gun', M1 carbines were 'M-16s', and mannequins wearing bizarre combos of nylon and WWII canvas gear...
...I guess that's what makes us nerds...

Chas Clifton said...

A couple friends marched into a curator's office at the natural history museum in Atlanta once and did succeed in at least getting a fair hearing over some mislabeling.

Only it was a traveling exhibit about the Etruscans, so the buck might have been passed.