Thursday, December 13, 2007

It's such a cliche...

...but the weatherman's a big fat liar.

This is what it says at the top of the weather.com page:


Notice the hint of sun in the icon and the clever use of the word "mostly"? This would seem to indicate that there is at least part of the sky not obscured by clouds, no?

Meanwhile, here's the radar pic from further down the very same page:


Notice the big squall line blowing through under leaden skies? I can assure you that when I look out my window here at VFTP Command Central, it is not "mostly cloudy". It is not "mostly" anything. It is one-hundred percent no-doubt raining like a cow peeing on a flat rock. And my patio furniture's trying to blow away.

Screw weather.com; I'm going back to hanging a weather rock outside my window...

6 comments:

Billy Beck said...

Well, now & then they forget to lie.

It's snowing at least an inch an hour here in Daisy Hollow. It's only twenty-eight degrees out, which almost qualifies as a heat-wave: I was just outside in a sweatshirt and almost comfortable.

It's about what they said it was going to do, although the verdict could have been brought from Buffalo by smoke-signals.

Dr. StrangeGun said...

This is why I like wunderground.com.

Today's photo is an anthropomorphized storm cloud puffed up and blowing.

Rustmeister said...

Weather rock never wrong.

BryanP said...

Ah yes. That was passing through Nashville between 5 and 6 this morning when I had the pleasure of changing a tire in the middle of it.

To add insult to injury the line passed by and it stopped raining just as I was tightening the last lug nut.

My comments at that time would be considered ever so much NSFW.

Jeff said...

That big seven-oh with the F beside it looks really good though. Up here in the Crossroads of America, we won't see 70 again until... April, May.

Tam said...

That big seven-oh is on the front side of that squall line; on the back side it was a big five-oh and falling like a rock, which is why it was as weatherlicious as it was.

Winter weather in the northern part of the southeast is capricious, being completely governed by the wanderings of the jet stream. We'll get a week's worth of high temps that read like this: 39, 35, 35, 68, 70, 22... and then we act all surprised by it every single year.