Saturday, July 19, 2014

Automotif XXXVII...

Parked in the same lot as the '40-something Dodge is this sweet-looking C3, a '71 smallblock, I am told. I've driven past it almost every day for more than a month, and finally just pulled the Zed into the lot at Nygaard's and pulled out the shirt-pocket Nikon. I need to pedal over there with the grownup camera.


13 comments:

Old NFO said...

Pretty, but they were way down on power... sigh

Tam said...

Let's see... Base model '71 L48 270-horse... C/D says 0-60 in 7.1 and a 15.55 quarter.

Considering that the "270" SAE gross brochure horsepower translates to probably ~200 net, that's not too shabby for a 3500-lb car.

joethefatman said...

I have always hated that body style 'Vette.

Anonymous said...

Fortunately there is a small industry based around the Corvette. There are kits available to allow the fitting of a modern LS small block. No great skill required, just send money and follow the instructions.

So many cars, so little money.....

Al_in_Ottawa

Garrett Lee said...

Sounded good, looked good, could not race worth anything. That's Corvette for you. (Evidence? Look at their finishing records at Sebring.)

Kirby Cobb said...

Sweet cheese 'n butter that's beautiful. How much and can I drive it home today?

DaveFla said...

Also, before the hideous bumpers and the smogtasticking of the L48... do want, especially in that blue.

drjim said...

1971 was the first year GM went from GROSS to NET HP ratings, which reflected the power output of the engine "as installed" in the vehicle, versus sitting on a dyno with the accessories (fan, power steering, etc) removed.

It was also the first year compression ratios dropped, but you could still get a solid-lifter, Holley-carbed "LT-1" engine in the Corvette and Z/28 Camaro, and it would remain that way through 1972.

Granted the carbs were leaned out, and the timing dialed back with a weird curve, but a few $$ worth of jets, springs, and weights would easily correct that!

Lewis said...

Requiem for Awerbuck.

DJ9 said...

When I was in my mid-teens, there was a young woman (early/mid 20s?)in my neighborhood who drove a dark-green '71 just like that one. Both generated lust in my heart, but the combo was almost lethal...

Anonymous said...

My Dad had a '63 split-window coupe with a 327. On the freeway at 60 mph it idled along at about 1200 rpm. I don't think that engine ever had to work very hard (except for the time that Mom was doing 125 and, well, never mind). Even then I don't think it was really working very hard.

I never got to drive it 'cause if the insurance agent ever found out, all the insurance we had would have been canceled (fiberglass body don'tcha know).

The odometer broke at 123K. Between Dad and Mom, the two of them put somewhere in the neighborhood of 275K (conservatively) and 350K on that car. Probably closer to the 350 than the 275.

The record for occupancy was 11 (or was it 13?), mostly little kids, going to church one Sunday. People just stood and stared as one kid after another piled out of the car and headed for the church door.

When Dad finally sold it, I think a piece of his soul went with it. He made no bones about the mileage though. He let the buyer know in no uncertain terms just how many miles the car had on it.

Four owners later, the title still hadn't been transferred, when we got a call from an excited enthusiast . . .

"Does this car really only have only 23K original miles on it? It's awesome!"

Apparently, every one of the previous four owners had claimed that it had " . . . only 23K original miles on it!" After picking myself up off the floor from laughing so hard, I thoroughly disabused him of the notion.

I suspect it's probably been sold several times since, and I'd be willing to bet that it still only has ". . . 23K original miles on it."

BSR

Will said...

'71 was the year that the car makers started sandbagging on HP numbers. My '71 Mustang 429SCJ was rated at 370hp, and garnered a +20% insurance premium for "excessive HP". BWAHHAAAAHAAAA!!! NHRA quickly rated them at 500hp once they hit the track.

In '71, I pumped gas into a '71 454 Vette, and the girl recognized me from 3rd grade! (One of my early clues that I seemed to be memorable to people I meet.) Car was all white, and she was dressed in all white. NJ resort beach town. She was complaining that they had to unbolt the motormounts to change some of the sparkplugs.
Got invited to a party at her place, where I met a guy with a split-window '63 Vette with bad 327 engine. From the description, I knew it would be an easy fix. We agreed to swap my '65 fastback 4sp Mustang even up. Showed up with title to do the swap, and he backed out. Someone told him what the problem was, and he decided to keep the car. Bummer.

That's what I remember whenever I see one of those Vettes :)

Tam said...

Will,

Oh, fiddlin' with the BHP (Brochure HorsePower) went on earlier than that.

My favorite example is that when they switched to the stricter SAE Net standard, the horsepower numbers for Mopar's 340 didn't change. :D