Saturday, April 19, 2008

April 19th, 1775.


"By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world"

Happy Patriot's Day to each and every one of y'all. :)

9 comments:

staghounds said...

A very moving spot. One hopes the monument will remain unaltered and no plaque explaining the collective rights theory of the bill of rights will be added.

.....CLIFFORD said...

Still the best articulation of a sound national defense policy I've ever heard.

Anonymous said...

". . .There's hardly a man left now alive that remembers that famous day and year."
To borrow from Longfellow's commemoration of the previous evening's equestrian events.

LittleRed1

Earl said...

President Clinton (the First?) didn't remember the date when he authorized the rescuing of the children in Waco, Texas. Times were simpler in 1775, get your gear stand in line and wait for orders. Tougher people, too.

Robert said...

Same sentiment to you, Tam.

Would God the term "patriot" held only its original meaning and had not been wrested to its proposed modern interpretation of "a believer in anything and everything the current federal regime says or does"!

doubletrouble said...

Lexington/Concord is a place you should visit sometime in your life. I grew up about 25 miles from there, & my folks took me there when I was a young-un. I took my son when he was old enough to appreciate what happened there.
The place gives one chills when sitting by the rude bridge & reflecting on the emergence of our Republic.

Mark said...

I was just there on Thursday. Great place to take photos.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/eclipsepics/1379208151/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/eclipsepics/199982337/

Reno Sepulveda said...

Right back at you young lady. I love your passion for history, especially this period.

Anonymous said...

Rmemeber that Capt. Parker was 6 months away from death from tuberculosis then. Stood with his men and the Regulars paid the butcher's bill when next they came through Lexington.