Monday, December 14, 2009

Constant craving...

Since I woke from a sound sleep at three-something in the AM, I've been nursing an ungodly craving for a bloody rare steak.

UPSIDE: There's an awesome meat department within easy jogging distance of the house.

DOWNSIDE: It's currently zero-dark-thirty in the AM and they don't open for another three and a half hours or so.

17 comments:

fastbike said...

Craving bloody steak in the middle of the night? Got any bite marks or claw marks you can't explain?

Joseph said...

Been reading MHI, have you??

OA said...

Sounds like your brainstem has decided to do something about your doldrums. I suggest doing the steak right (It'll make you're brainstem happy to do it the way Thagette would have) and cooking it over wood coals, temperature be damned. Hell, you don't even need a "real" grill. A cinder block, a chimney starter with some lump charcoal, and a grill grate over the top will do just fine for briefly searing some grill marks before turning then inhaling.

Joel said...

Thank god it's not a full moon! :)

Weer'd Beard said...

My wife makes a DAMN good steak with a cast iron skillet. Makes the kitchen a hair smokey, but MMM it is DAMN good.

reflectoscope said...

Steak and eggs for breakfast: Good enough for astronauts, good enough for everyone.

Jim

Tam said...

Weer'd,

Yup. When I do it on the stovetop, there's butter to... uh... to keep it from sticking to the skillet (Yeah, to "keep it from sticking"! That's the ticket!), a sprinkle from the garlic/oregano shaker, a splash of Worcestershire, and a splash of merlot right before it comes out.

It is yummy.

Anonymous said...

Texas rare: show it a live hot coal, briefly.

But, a good crackling skillet sear, with appropriate condiment seared into the fast-burned crust, is a fine way to git y'r rare.

Make sure the skillet is up to heat -- don't want to overcook all that carnivorous red-meat interior.

Have the exhaust fan before you start.

J,t R

Ed Foster said...

My grandmother used to do venison haunch the old country way.

She would bone out the hind quarter, cut it into 2 inch thick steaks, drop them into the rain barrel, then wring and twist them until all the blood was out.

Then she would make up some marinade, and leave them in the cellar overnight, with a brick on top of each piece to keep it from floating.

The next day she would get a frying pan going with lots of butter and freshly crushed garlic, sear each side of the steaks, then tie them in a tight bundle and do them as a roast.

Done up with her white sauce, you needed a knife to get through the crust, than you could seperate the rest with the edge of your fork.

Old Tony Strumm, the hermit/moonshiner from up the road, was shocked that she didn't hang the meat for a week, that she'd rinse and wring out freshly killed meat and eat it the next day.

Since deer fat has no earthly use and goes rancid in hours, especially if some butthead leaves the hide on to hold in the remaining body heat, I suspect Tony was used to that crappy liver taste in all the dozens of deer he had jacked over the years.

He wangled an invite to dinner, and thought he was eating veal.

Butter is it's own excuse.

Anonymous said...

GO FOR IT!!
Eat a steak, as rare as possible (wish the cow a speedy recovery as it passes through the kitchen, as my Dad used to say). Then hibernate for the next day or two.

Yum!
B Woodman
III-per

Anonymous said...

nothing like a good steak! I don't care what time of day it is, steak is always appropriate. Bon Apatite!

Anonymous said...

If you can be patient and wish really hard, then maybe a box of bison meat will show up in a few days. I'm just saying.

Shootin' Buddy

BobG said...

Nothing cheers up a person like a good rare steak.

Joanna said...

I'll settle for leaving nose prints on the butcher's case.

Kristopher said...

Picture: Tam jumping up and down in front of a closed store at o'dark thirty, chanting "Meat ... I Must Have Meat ..."

Mikael said...

You guys are evil, evil I say... and I've got a 2.3lb beefsteak in the freezer intended for a future dinner with mom and perhaps one of her neighbors; and it's going to haunt me all day now.

I cut it into roughly square inch pieces, lightly spice it with a favorite mix, and fry it for 30-45 seconds per side(in a castiron pan with lots of butter). The result is like french restaurant steak ordered rare, with just the spice mix being a little different... it's exquisite.

Tam said...

Mikael,

I'm thinking a ribeye, about... um... (plays with calculator) about 425g. One big slab of grain-fed goodness, seared on the outside and still twitching on the inside...