Wednesday, March 31, 2010

This little piggy went to market...

...and I'll bet he wishes he'd stayed home...

Farmer Frank looks like he's having entirely too much fun with this feral hog thumping business. I've got to try my hand at it.

23 comments:

Hypnagogue said...

Please, please, please, bring enough gun.

Paul said...

I'm up for it. Love to hit one...also need an excuse to build an AR in 6.8 SPC.

Tam said...

As it stands now, I would probably use a 6.8 SPC barrel in my AR, but I'll be soliciting plenty of suggestions from folks who have BTDT.

Anonymous said...

Tam,

This isn't the correct way to contact you, but I just noticed you were quoted on lsrebellion.blogspot.com. You are now officially on the SPLC radar!

Weer'd Beard said...

but but those guns have NO SPORTING PURPOSE!!!!

The VPC told me so!

Tam said...

"You are now officially on the SPLC radar!"

Great. Does that mean I'm a racist now?

Anonymous said...

"Great. Does that mean I'm a racist now?"

You may be well on your way. Remember this from THE HUNTING OF THE SNARK:

"I have said it thrice: What I tell you three times is true."

Back to the thread, though, I'd love to go hog hunting. I'm thinking my 45-70 Marlin would be the medicine.

Hypnagogue said...

The peanut farms and cattle ranches I hunt have changed to 6.8 a few years back and are doing well. I usually use my .454 Casull lever action. I also brought a Glock 20 this spring, but didn't find a pig. Bring a hunting handgun.

For the record, .223 and .357 Sig are NOT enough gun.

Tam said...

No matter what the rifle, there'll be a .41 Mag stoked with 265gr hard cast SWC along.

dave said...

I very much enjoy my 1895G (.45-70) when hunting hogs. Porky doesn't even twitch.

BobG said...

Time for a barbecue.

Stranger said...

There are hog hunts and hog hunts. A cornfield at night is a good place for a hog hunt, and I would like to try corn field hunting some time.

Unfortunately, we have pine "hells" that are as thick as the bristles on a boars back. Visibility is normally less than 15 yards, and the hogs are usually coming fast. As in one shot fast.

Which makes it sort of exciting if you miss and there's not a limb within grabbing range. Or if your boots have filled with water and you suddenly realize you weigh 370 pounds.

I don't think I want a 6.8 on a Missis-sloppy hog hunt. I have taken a lot of pork with a Marlin 1894, but a HS kid who hunts with us tried that and was torn up pretty badly.

Since I set a bad example for the lad, I use a 45/70 now.

Stranger

Tam said...

I believe I'd want something stouter than a 6.8 if were going toe-to-toe with piggy in the brush myself.

Byron used to tell the the tale of the hog he shot in the shoulder as it trotted across a clearing. He smacked it with a .35 Whelen at less than 50 yards. It stopped, turned around, and started heading back the way it had come and didn't drop until he hit it in the other shoulder with a .35 Whelen.

I think it was Al T. (or maybe John Shirley) who mentioned tagging another pig at short range in those same woods with a charge of 00B, and several of the pellets didn't make it through the gristle plate.

Anonymous said...

Pig hunting is a lot of fun! The fun part is you can never have enough gun! I have gotten them with 357 maqg. all the way to 50 cal bmg rounds( boy do they work good!) Just make sure you don't piss miss piggy off! She can be a very mean and ornary cuss.

Walt

Will said...

This hog attack is entertaining. Think the hunter sliding down the hill nailed it, but not sure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bDEqF48U-A

TJP said...

These things are the most obnoxious vermin to ever defile the landscape. Is there any way that we could get Mr. James to kill more of them?

Anonymous said...

I'll chime in and agree that 6.8 is a nice DEER cartridge (for some applications), but that's not what you want when hunting feral piggies. Depending on where you hunt, you can run into 30-70lb "perfect eatin' size" pigs, or you can run into 300lb or larger monsters that don't have a decent ham sandwich anywhere on them.

My intro to pig hunting was with Ashley Emerson (of AO and XS sight fame) and another good friend of mine who had guided for years. They both gave good advice, which I will pass on here. "Bring your favorite elk rifle and premium bullets, and bring LOTS of bullets." I've never had more fun in the field than hog hunting, but you gotta bring enough gun. Used my .308 scout for years, but switched to a .376 scout after a run-in with a 400lb (or larger) "swamp monster" on the ranch. I couldn't bring myself to pull the trigger on the 180gr partition load, because I was seriously concerned that the hog might take offense.

.357, .41, .44 magnums are OK backup guns for finishing shots or smaller targets of opportunity (we also sometimes carry 10mm Glocks) but Ashley is rather famous for his 4" Bowen Redhawk converted to a proprietary .500 (435'ish at 1200'ish if I remember correctly). That particular gun kicks harder than my M329PD, and that's saying something. Sure does a number on the hogs though, of any size.

Formerflyer

Anonymous said...

Formerflyer, one of my life changing events was shooting a Bowen (IIRC) clone of Ashley's revolver in NC about 8 years back. The guy who owned it hunts with Ashley too. I fired five shots and wished I had stopped at two. Again IIRC, Tam popped a few rounds through it as well.

It was me with the buckshot - one pellet penetrated the rib cage by going between two ribs. The rest of the load was mostly on the ribs as the gristle shield had stopped the penetration. I also used two slugs to kill the critter - recovered both - only time I've ever recovered a slug. Killed a bunch of deer with 1 oz. slugs and never recovered one. Impressive critters.

Al T.

Frank W. James said...

I concur with all the remarks about '...having enough gun...' One of the best remarks I've ever heard after three years of serious feral hog hunting is they "...the poor man's grizzley..."

The big advantage I have is we are shooting them from ambush, almost always in the open (farm fields), and in total darkness. They never know we are there and that first shot is a REALLY BIG surprise.

After that things get kinda busy.

The big problem is working out of vehicles quietly after finding them with the thermal. Big guns are literally big guns and they bang into things before they become BANG sticks. Sound and scent disclipline is a big part of this gig.

All The Best,
Frank W. James

Anonymous said...

Silly bastards around this part of the Fla outback circle a patch of palmetto thicket with their trucks until there's a whole pog of pig holed up in the middle, then they send in the dogs.

Some of those big ol' thistlebacks have cutters the size of saucers and sometimes an unlucky mutt pays the price, but they work as a pack and usually pin the hog..."ketch 'at pig, boy, ketch 'im!" till the big ol' redneck boys get there with the Redhawk (sometimes just a Buck knife and a rope if they're really feeling their grits).

Seems insane, but the boys and the dogs all seem to love it, and live (usually) in anticipation of the next hunt.

On an early Saturday morning, you'll see the redneck boys gathered around the trucks at the Circle K, dog boxes in some and a holding pen in another, the catch of the night inside, sometimes dead and sometimes bloody and very, very pissed. You don't have to see the pig to know he's in there though; that is some stinkin' shit you can smell from a block away, and I wouldn't eat it on a bet, but I guess they do.

Pretty symbiotic relationship all the way around (except for the hawgs of course)...ranchers want the pigs out, they boys love to oblige, and the dogs seem happy to help. There's some weird and wonderful shit goes on in the world, still.

AT

Tam said...

I don't know if Larry Harley still guides pig hunts with a knife. You got to keep the pig sticker afterward, though.

B_L said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiHmYsyVniE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM9z4DOgnuI

Anonymous said...

Do remember one important thing when hunting feral pigs; The winner eats the loser. Arm yourself accordingly.