Monday, July 30, 2012

Arsenal of Democracy, Hoosier Division

It makes a statement tastefully, no?

I want this molding from the Indiana World War Memorial Military Museum in my dream home. I especially like the alternating grenades and .30-'06 rounds on stripper clips between the clusters of cannon shells.

8 comments:

Murphy's Law said...

I would have that in my house. Cool.

Anonymous said...

I still prefer the governors mansion in Virginia with the interlaced sabres and such, but yes, very nice.

Brad K. said...

I think the motif evokes the masses of military folk that got all too familiar with the accessories to war.

In a museum, they provide a connection to the past, to the concepts and fears and triumphs of our parents and, now, grand-parents.

I doubt that I would think they made the same connection to history, an to the might of a motivated Army. I would hate to give Disarmed Victim Zone advocates and premeditated "SWAT"ers' such a hot button.

The point of going to war for the US has been to live in peace, well, and to intimidate folk that want to gouge us or cost us money or prestige. The Second Amendment implies that we are to retain those weapons of war, to be used wisely against tyrants foreign and domestic, when all other remedies have failed. Even with that as a background, I would hope that our homes and our lives express dreams of a less war-like nature. Kittens. Chickens. Children and elders. Community and nature. Exploration of the seas, space, and the inner self.

And cherished toys, of course. Forget what I said.

DirtCrashr said...

The over-the-door ones look like fat little WSM rounds.

Woodman said...

Actually it's part of the Masonic emergency defense network. Those may look like painted wooden models but each conceals a hidden drawer filled with ammunition of the type depicted on the facade.

Fuzzy Curmudgeon said...

I neither confirm nor deny that the altar room in the memorial could conceivably be tyled as a Masonic lodge room.

Gnarly Sheen said...

I guess I'm more oblivious than I originally thought, I didn't see any of those things until you pointed them out.

HTRN said...

One of the more interesting "gunny" type cabinetry I've come across recently, is retired gunmaker Richard Franklins house - he has uninletted rifle stocks for banisters on his stairs.