Sunday, March 16, 2014

Yes, spelling does matter.

11 comments:

Ancient Woodsman said...

Heh! Were folks actually buying them?

I remember a Pvt. Murphy cartoon about a misspelled tattoo: "Airbone". Your post somehow reminded me of that.

staghounds said...

It conforms better to observable reality than the other one and is a lot more practical. E. g. nra, aarp, nea, uaw...

Mike_C said...

Snerk! cough cough -- Gatorade up sinuses. (Hung over, thank almighty Dues for ibuprofen and normally-icky "rehydration" drinks.)

Embroidery machine with autocorrect? Fiendish plot?

Beetle Bailey cartoon: Sarge and Beetle spot a storefront sign reading "Dougnut Dan's." After a bit of mild hilarity they decide to go in and inform the shopkeeper of the misspelling. They come out eating happily from a bag of doughnuts. Final panel cuts to inside of shop. Shopkeeper says "Business has improved since I made that sign."

Christina LMT said...

Oh, dear God. I can't even...no, I'm done. People are stupid, and they don't even know it.

Windy Wilson said...

I don't have anything particularly witty to say.
I've come to believe that words are like keys to unlock ideas in the mind(s)of the reader(s). Misspelled words, like this one, cause the eye to stumble. It becomes like a key that has to be jiggled in the lock to work. And that hesitation interrupts or slows the communication of the idea.

Windy Wilson said...

I suppose membership dues could be considered a sort of vox populi, vox dei.

Anonymous said...

Are you sure they were "morale" patches and not "moral" patches? I mean, grammatical errors do tend toward a herd-like mentality.

mikee said...

This campane against tipografic errurs in dead languages has gone to farr.

I have enuf trubble keeping up with typoes in American, let alone Lattin.

ProudHillbilly said...

I'm not sure if that's funny or sad.

rickn8or said...

Yep.
Gettin' quite the return on our Property Tax dollar.

Anonymous said...

Don't forget that commas save lives, too.

Just look at how these two sentences have radically different meanings with the inclusion of a single comma:

Let's eat grandma!
Let's eat, grandma!