Monday, October 13, 2008

Tactical mustaches and sideburns...

I'm sitting here watching a cool DVD re-issue of Jeff Cooper's Defensive Pistolcraft video set. It was recorded at Orange Gunsite back in the day, which in this case means 1987.

Lots of mustachioed instructors, Jeff Cooper in the classroom and tooling around on the tactical trike, 2-tone 1911s with Bo-Mar low mounts.

It's interesting to see how much has changed (pure Weaver v. Modern Isosceles, tritium sights are a gadget, the old-school drawstroke presentation,) and how the basic principles remain the same, from "Front Sight, Press" to the Four Rules being presented in their natural habitat.

He hasn't said "rabbit people" yet, but we're only halfway through disc one, so I'm holding out hope.

Here's a sample: Vidjo.

8 comments:

José Giganté said...

Didja order those from Paladin-Press or what? I wouldn't mind getting hold of a set.

José Giganté said...

N/M, I should click on the link!

trebor1415 said...

What's the "old school" presentation and how is it different from the modern draw?


You know though, even though the state of the art has changed consideribly in 20 years, somehow I think any Gunsite grad from 1987 who earned their "E" ticket, if they were dropped into today's world, would be just as well off today as someone who learned the current style of defensive handgunning.

As you noted, the fundamentals of "front sight, press" are the same. I tend the think the variations aren't as important as mastery of whatever technique you've chosen to use.

Tam said...

"What's the "old school" presentation and how is it different from the modern draw?"

From the two count to the three count, you "bowl" the gun in the old style, rather than the current emphasis on pushing it forward after rotating the muzzle downrange.

I'd imagine this change came after enough people had lobbed loaded guns towards the berm on hurried presentations...

staghounds said...

Dr. Death's attire always made him look like he was headed out to the bars to pick up a cowboy.

I've seen guns thrown three times in practice. It's very amusing to the spectators, because there isn't time to process fear of being shot by a spare.

Johnny said...

I take it `the Modern Isoceles' is different from the isoceles everyone used before the Weaver? Not that it's much use in UK anyway.

pR0N star mustaches will never go out of fashion.

Tam said...

"I take it `the Modern Isoceles' is different from the isoceles everyone used before the Weaver?"

It mostly differs in that the weak-side foot is more towards the target and you lean into the pistol with slightly bent knees. There are other differences, but those are the most visible.

Johnny said...

Thanks Tam - what you're telling me is it's the typical isoceles positions you would see from people who'd never heard of the Weaver Stance if you let them just get on with what works for them. Tho people do have a tendency to bend their knees excessively and tip their head forward unless you give them a boot up the arse to remind them they're doing it (hey, in military training in my day you were encouraged to boot recruits up the arse pour encourager les autres... it's what made us the men we are today).

The Weaver Stance will come back in fashion again in the fullness of time I don't doubt.