Thursday, May 08, 2014

More later...

Should have taken the macro lens to the range. Light hit? Primer not seated all the way? Cap popped on the second try. Was it reman'ed ammo? Dunno, I pulled 50 rounds out of the loose ammo can to run through the PPX, and it could be factory Blazer Brass, or it could be a factory reload. Had this result twice.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

My vote is for Blazer Brass, the ONLY misfires ever experienced with my Glock 36.
MACVS2

Fred said...

I had one light strike on Remington factory reloads during firearms at the academy with my M&P. Never been a problem before, or since, so I'm blaming the ammo.

Ed said...

http://www.blazer-ammo.com/blazer_brass.aspx

"CCI® primers insure reliable ignition..."

Hmmm. They are reliable because they say they are?

Jay Dee said...

With new guns, I like to strip the slide and clean the firing pin/striker in detail. Surprising how much gunk you find here.

Critter said...

striker fired pistol is striker fired.

Tam said...

Critter,

"striker fired pistol is striker fired."

Commenter is incorrect. Pistol is hammer-fired.

(The round in the picture was dropped into a G26 which ignited it.)

Paul said...

Had a 357 Dan and Wesson that did that from time to time. It had a little bitty piece the hammer hit to push into the primer. Hosed it down with some CLP and that seemed to help. Course I traded it off pretty soon after so unknown how long the repair lasted.

Richard Blaine said...

I hesitate to diagnose an issue without hands on exam of offending pieces parts. From the image, the primer looks well seated, perhaps a bit over seated? - As if the primer pocket had been cut a touch too deep, and the primer seated by pressure (normal for us hand loaders) rather than by a preset face flush (not sure ANYONE does that). If the primer is recessed, then it might be an issue with the throw of the firing pin - Id' expect the pin to have enough travel to ignite a slightly recessed primer.... All of the above is simply speculation - I would be interested to know if what I took to be a recessed primer was a misinterpretation of the photo - lighting and angle can do that when you don't have sharp edges (primer edges rounded, pocket edges beveled).

just a thought.

Critter said...

Such pedantry. :p

AuricTech said...

For this particular round, hammer-fired pistol is not hammer-fired. Not-hammer-fired round was striker-fired.

;-)

DJ9 said...

Off-center strike usually indicates slide was not completely closed and/or barrel was not fully locked into firing position in the slide. Some of the energy of the hammer or striker ends up being redirected to closing the slide the rest of the way, leaving insufficient remaining energy to fire the round.

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it...

Leslie Sapp said...

9mm headspaces on the case mouth. A bad crimp, short case, etc., can let the round feed too far into the chamber and cause a light strike. In the absence of other evidence, I'd lean towards bad ammo.

abnormalist said...

My bet is primer not seated deeply enough, I had this happen a few times fairly early in my reloading career.

As far as CCI primers, I've loaded up (more than) a few thousand without issues that I can pin on them. Very consistant, and actually my preference.

Firearms and ammunition are all man made mechanical devices, and therefore failure isnt a question of if, but when. This is exactly why we practice rack-tap-bang

Tam said...

Paul,

" It had a little bitty piece the hammer hit to push into the primer."

Yes, that would be the firing pin. :)

Firehand said...

Out of Bleep-knows-how-many-thousands of rifle and pistol rounds loaded with CCI primers, I've had one that misfired.

On the other hand, out of a box of Wolf small pistol I picked up when there was nothing else available... how the ammo can go 'bang' every time but the primers were such crap, I don't know.

Firehand said...

Mind you, possible I got the ONE bad sleeve of primers, but damn.

Kristophr said...

These hammer and striker things will never be reliable.

I suggest using a salt-petre Match to ignite your Hand-Gonne.

Steve Florman said...

Blazer: Can't shoot it, can't leave it in the school cafeteria.

Only thing I've ever bought that won't feed in my Hi-Power. Never touch it again.